Graduate Timetable

Graduate Courses

Students are able and expected to enrol in courses through ACORN. Note: for graduate students outside of WGSI, you will only be able to enrol once course enrolment has opened in your home graduate unit.

The SGS Add/Drop is not required to enrol in WGSI graduate courses. Students outside of WGSI who are enrolled in a graduate program offered by the School of Graduate Studies at U of T can enrol in WGSI graduate courses through ACORN. If your home graduate unit requires the add drop form, please email the form to the WGSI Program Office for processing at: wgsi.programs@utoronto.ca


Important Dates

For sessional dates, please see the dates provided by the School of Graduate Studies.

2024-2025 Graduate Course Offerings

WGS5000H: Feminist Theories, Histories, Movements I

Session: F • Tuesdays 10am – 1pm • Instructor: S. Trimble

This core course explores interdisciplinary feminist theories, methodologies and epistemologies, with particular attention to transnational feminism, anti- and post-colonialism, global capitalism, critical race theory, nation and state formation, gender and sexuality studies and affect theory.

WGS5001H: Feminist Theories, Histories, Movements II

Session: S Tuesdays 10am – 1pm • Instructor: Alissa Trotz

This qualitative methods seminar is designed for doctoral students developing research projects with feminist interdisciplinary, transnational and intersectional commitments. It will explore feminist theories and debates on epistemologies and methodologies, paying close attention to the “why” and “how” of the research process, or what Professor Emerita M. Jacqui Alexander refers to as the itinerary of an idea, as well as the complex process of its realisation. Simply put, how does something begin as a nagging question, a provocation, even an epiphany, and proceed, in fits and starts, until it morphs into a fully-fledged research project, sometimes in ways that bear faint resemblance to what appeared at one point to be a very certain starting place? 

WGS1004H: Decolonial and Feminist Technoscience: Another Universe is Possible

Session: F • Tuesdays 1pm – 3pm • Instructors: M. Murphy & Kristen Bos

Please check back for this course description.

WGS1023H: Aesthetics of Radical Hope

Session: F • Thursdays 11am – 1pm • Instructor: Dina Georgis

This course reframes the idea of hope through radical enunciations of the imagination. By drawing on works from postcolonial studies, cultural studies and psychoanalysis, the course offers a way to think about the aesthetic as it relates to the capacity to compose “otherwise possibilities” (Crawley, in excess of the terms of liberal humanism. The imagination’s radical

potential for an ‘otherwise’ will be explored through various concepts such as the “not yet conscious” (Munoz), queer archives, curiosity and play.

WGS1029H: Black Feminist Histories: Movements, Method, and the Archive 

Session: F • Wednesdays 1pm – 3pm • Instructor: Chris Johnson

This seminar provides an introduction to historiographies of Black feminism, and Black feminist approaches to history, memory and the archive. It studies activism and knowledge-making from the nineteenth century to our contemporary moment, with a particular focus on histories of anti-imperialist and anti-colonial struggle across diasporas. For our purposes, “Movements” refers to intellectual/cultural/political mobilizations and fronts, as well as the travel of people and ideas. We will situate our texts historically as well as transnationally to examine contexts and collectives that generated imaginative practices of invention, connection and intervention that continue to animate ongoing movements for solidarity and liberation. In addition to foundational and emerging scholarship on women, gender and Black radical traditions, we will explore history-making and the political uses of the past through close readings of literary works as well as various forms of political ephemera. This seminar invites participants to build on rich traditions of self-making, bridge-building and freedom dreaming through self-reflection, creative expression and engaged scholarship. Our collective endeavor is not simply to reckon with, honor and critique what has gone before us, but also to orient ourselves toward new terrains and new questions.

WGS1031H: Gendering Racial Capitalism

Session: F • Mondays 1pm – 3pm • Instructor: Shauna Sweeney

Racial capitalism is a regime of capital accumulation predicated on the creation and mobilization of racial differences among human beings. This course aims to historicize racial capitalism both as a specific set of social relations in particular times/places and as a theoretical intervention into traditional Marxian political economy, underscoring the centrality of gender ideology to both modern conceptualizations of race and class. If capitalism alienates workers from the means of production, producing stratified class societies in the process, gender and race serve to divide human beings even further into different categories of human beings. They can function as critical fault lines of division and, simultaneously, as wellsprings of solidarity. Through a close reading of Cedric J. Robinson’s hallmark text, Black Marxism: The Black Radical Tradition, as well as critical engagement with historians of slavery, race, and reproduction; black feminists; queer theorists; and contemporary popular culture, students will grapple with the genealogies gendered racial capitalism. We will pay special attention of to the efforts of black feminists who have insisted on the centrality of intersectional approaches to both radical critiques of political economy and radical movements for liberation. At the same time, we will explore the flexibility and adaptability of racial capitalism –– its ability to absorb and deflect critique. Topics covered in this course include: racial capitalism and the black radical tradition; early modern capital accumulation and racial formation; race and reproduction from slavery to neoliberalism; theorizing super-exploitation; surveillance capitalism, the carceral state; queer anti-capitalism and the politics of pleasure.

WGS1009H: Against and Beyond Carcerality: Abolitionist Worldmaking

Session: S • Wednesdays 1pm – 3pm • Instructor: Robyn Maynard

Please check back for this course description.

WGS1016H: Migration, Mobility, and Displacement in Contemporary Africa

Session: S • Tuesdays 3pm – 5pm • Instructor: Marieme Lo

Why do people move? What are the causes and consequences of migration and displacement in Africa? This course critically examines the multifaceted dimensions of migration, mobility, and displacement through (text, art, film and narratives) with a specific focus on communities and populations displaced by war, environmental destruction and disaster, economic failings, and the quest for economic opportunities or individual freedom. We will: 1) explore canonical and emergent interdisciplinary scholarships and their epistemic claims and debates, key theories and concepts on migration, mobility and displacement; 2) engage in current debates and public discourses on these intersecting themes, analytics, and phenomena; and 3) interrogate the morality of media representation and gaze, discursive practices on the ‘migrant’ and ‘refugee’ subject formation, the ‘catastrophic’ biopolitics and governmentality of migration, the instrumentality and contingencies of political (non) interventions/(in)action, humanitarianism, and the politics of rights, justice, ethics, and solidarity. You will have the opportunity to unpack your own positionality and trajectories to reflect on the differentiated categories and trajectories of migration and mobility and to formulate your own critique and alternative epistemology.

WGS1017H: Queer and Trans Nightlife

Session: S • Mondays 5pm – 7pm • Instructor: Robert Diaz

Please check back for this course description.

WGS1018H: Self-Study: Where Research And Making Things Begins, and Travels

Session: S • Thursdays 1pm – 3pm • Instructor: Judith Taylor

Please check back for this course description.

WGS1028H: Queer of Colour Critique

Session: S • Tuesdays 1pm – 3pm • Instructor: Cassandra Lord

This course tracks the deployment and emergence of “queer of color critique” and its interconnections with women of color feminisms. We will examine theoretical texts, cultural production and forms of activism by queer scholars of color who attend to questions of race, class, sexuality and gender as intersecting social practices.

WGS1030H: Indigenous Feminism

Session: S • Thursdays 11am – 1pm • Instructor: Kai Recollet

Drawing from Indigenous feminist conversations taken up within the field, this course practices an ethics of care and focuses on relationality through exploring Black and Indigenous feminist ‘texts’ as forms of remapping, and reimagining “otherwise” spatial forms of reworlding. This course gathers a series of texts and conversations focusing on decolonial anti-conquest feminist abolitionist frameworks and theories to illuminate and analyse Indigenous feminist spatial projects of liberation through highlighting the transformative, or worlding potentials of Indigenous feminist theories. Together we lean into critiques of settler colonial infrastructures and forms of feminist abolition frameworks of relational creative work of ‘gathering’ to highlight ‘otherwise’ modes of activating in the world.

This course makes possible a deep exploration of a set of conversations and fields of inquiry centered around Indigenous feminist ‘gatherings’ forms of space making through a set of ethical orientations towards forms of liberatory social transformation and change. As such we will be examining actions, manifesto’s, speculative fiction writing, poetics and other world-making strategies that abolitionist and anticolonial feminists have engaged to create alternative worlds. We account for and archive a critiquing of modes of discourses, and representations rooted in settler colonial atmospherics as we radically engage in theorizing ‘gatherings’ / relational creative work altering settler cartographies; and generate work together that explore practices and grammars feminist abolitionists are activating to create alternative spatial scales of liberation. For example, we will be exploring the writings and relational creative works of key thinkers such as: Angela Davis, Katherine McKittrick,& Mishauna Goeman.


Graduate Course Timetable

WGS Core Courses

WGS5000H: Feminist Theories, Histories, Movements I

This core course explores interdisciplinary feminist theories, methodologies and epistemologies, with particular attention to transnational feminism, anti- and post-colonialism, global capitalism, critical race theory, nation and state formation, gender and sexuality studies and affect theory.

WGS5001H Feminist Theories, Histories, Movements I

This is an advanced course designed for doctoral students, which explores feminist debates on epistemology, methodology and methods, paying close attention to the “why” and “how” of the research process, or what Professor Emerita M. Jacqui Alexander refers to as the itinerary of an idea, as well as the complex process of its realisation. This course offers a space for students to reflect carefully, creatively and critically on their research journeys, while also offering an opportunity to address/demystify the moving parts of the doctoral process.

WGS1005Y: Master’s Research Paper

**Enrolment is restricted to students registered in the Master’s and Ph.D. Degree Programs in Women and Gender Studies or Collaborative Specialization in Women and Gender Studies.

WGS1007H: Directed Research/Reading

Under supervision, students can pursue an independent research/reading course on topics in Women and Gender Studies that are not currently part of the curriculum. **Students must have a project that a WGSI Faculty member is willing to supervise. To enroll in WGS1007H, please email: wgsi.programs@utoronto.ca

WGS Electives

Not all courses are offered every year.

WGS1004H Special Topis in Feminist Theory

Subject varies from year to year. Check WGSI website for information about this offering.

WGS1009H: Special Topics in Feminist Studies 1

Subject varies from year to year. Check WGSI website for information about this offering.

WGS1010H: Special Topics in Feminist Studies 2

Subject varies from year to year. Check WGSI website for information about this offering.

WGS1011H: Special Topics in Feminist Studies 3

Subject varies from year to year. Check WGSI website for information about this offering.

WGS1013H: Special Topics in Feminist Theory 1

Subject varies from year to year. Check WGSI website for information about this offering.

WGS1014H: Special Topics in Feminist Theory 2

Subject varies from year to year. Check WGSI website for information about this offering.

WGS1016H Migration, Mobility, and Displacement in Contemporary Africa

Why do people move? What are the causes and consequences of migration and displacement in Africa? This course critically examines the multifaceted dimensions of migration, mobility, and displacement through (text, art, film and narratives) with a specific focus on communities and populations displaced by war, environmental destruction and disaster, economic failings, and the quest for economic opportunities or individual freedom. We will: 1) explore canonical and emergent interdisciplinary scholarships and their epistemic claims and debates, key theories and concepts on migration, mobility and displacement; 2) engage in current debates and public discourses on these intersecting themes, analytics, and phenomena; and 3) interrogate the morality of media representation and gaze, discursive practices on the ‘migrant’ and ‘refugee’ subject formation, the ‘catastrophic’ biopolitics and governmentality of migration, the instrumentality and contingencies of political (non) interventions/(in)action, humanitarianism, and the politics of rights, justice, ethics, and solidarity. You will have the opportunity to unpack your own positionality and trajectories to reflect on the differentiated categories and trajectories of migration and mobility and to formulate your own critique and alternative epistemology.

WGS1017H: Special Topics in Feminist Studies

Subject varies from year to year. Check WGSI website for information about this offering.

WGS1018H: Special Topics in Feminist Studies

Subject varies from year to year. Check WGSI website for information about this offering.

WGS1019H: Special Topics in Feminist Studies

Subject varies from year to year. Check WGSI website for information about this offering.

WGS1020H Gender and Globalization: Transnational Perspectives

This course critically examines current interdisciplinary and feminist scholarship on globalization, its intersections with gender, race and class, neoliberal transformations, power structures, and sexualized and feminized economies. The related socio-spatial reconfigurations, “global” convergences, and tensions are explored, with special emphasis placed on feminist counter-narratives, alternative epistemologies and theorizing of globalization, the theoretical and political debates on the meanings and impacts of globalization, and the exploration of radical possibilities of resistance, agency, and change in local and transnational contexts.

WGS1021H: Black Diasporic Feminisms: Modernity, Freedom, Belonging

This course examines transnational feminist genealogies of the black diaspora, paying careful attention to the contexts and movements that generated key questions, and exploring how these interventions disclose preoccupations with modernity, freedom and citizenship. Topics include history, trauma and memory, diaspora and indigeneity, racialised embodiment, queer kinship, Afrofuturism, confinement and deportation, and the careful calibration of political communities.

WGS1022H: Special Topics in Feminist Studies

Subject varies from year to year. Check WGSI website for information about this offering.

WGS1023H The Aesthetics of Radical Hope

This course reframes the idea of hope through radical enunciations of the imagination. By drawing on works from postcolonial studies, cultural studies and psychoanalysis, the course offers a way to think about the aesthetic as it relates to the capacity to compose “otherwise possibilities” (Crawley, in excess of the terms of liberal humanism. The imagination’s radical

potential for an ‘otherwise’ will be explored through various concepts such as the “not yet conscious” (Munoz), queer archives, curiosity and play.

WGS1024H: Special Topics in Feminist Studies

Subject varies from year to year. Check WGSI website for information about this offering.

WGS1025H: Futurities: World-Making within a Series of World Endings

This course explores the multi-textured sites of anti-colonial relational creation work as sites of aesthetic and analysis. Offering an Indigenous anti-colonial/ abolitionist framework, this course explores impactful theories within Indigenous and Black futurisms through gathering around short films, visual arts, sonic enunciations, dance and other relational creative works to explore our relationships to futures from within the slipstream as a space of liberation. What might encounters with futurist work tell us about what liberation looks like? How do we together imagine and practice a freedom that we haven’t practiced before? What do these forms of world-making tell us about the forms of belonging and becoming in the future?

WGS1027H: Special Topics in Queer Studies and Feminism

Subject varies from year to year. Check WGSI website for information about this offering.

WGS1028H Queer of Color Critique

This course tracks the deployment and emergence of “queer of color critique” and its interconnections with women of color feminisms. We will examine theoretical texts, cultural production and forms of activism by queer scholars of color who attend to questions of race, class, sexuality and gender as intersecting social practices.

WGS1029H: Black Feminist Histories: Movements, Method, and the Archive

This seminar provides an introduction to historiographies of Black feminism, and Black feminist approaches to history, memory and the archive. It studies activism and knowledge-making from the nineteenth century to our contemporary moment, with a particular focus on histories of anti-imperialist and anti-colonial struggle across diasporas. For our purposes, “Movements” refers to intellectual/cultural/political mobilizations and fronts, as well as the travel of people and ideas. We will situate our texts historically as well as transnationally to examine contexts and collectives that generated imaginative practices of invention, connection and intervention that continue to animate ongoing movements for solidarity and liberation. In addition to foundational and emerging scholarship on women, gender and Black radical traditions, we will explore history-making and the political uses of the past through close readings of literary works as well as various forms of political ephemera. This seminar invites participants to build on rich traditions of self-making, bridge-building and freedom dreaming through self-reflection, creative expression and engaged scholarship. Our collective endeavor is not simply to reckon with, honor and critique what has gone before us, but also to orient ourselves toward new terrains and new questions.

WGS1030H: Indigenous Feminism

Drawing from Indigenous feminist conversations taken up within the field, this course practices an ethics of care and focuses on relationality through exploring Black and Indigenous feminist ‘texts’ as forms of remapping, and reimagining “otherwise” spatial forms of reworlding. This course gathers a series of texts and conversations focusing on decolonial anti-conquest feminist abolitionist frameworks and theories to illuminate and analyse Indigenous feminist spatial projects of liberation through highlighting the transformative, or worlding potentials of Indigenous feminist theories. Together we lean into critiques of settler colonial infrastructures and forms of feminist abolition frameworks of relational creative work of ‘gathering’ to highlight ‘otherwise’ modes of activating in the world.

This course makes possible a deep exploration of a set of conversations and fields of inquiry centered around Indigenous feminist ‘gatherings’ forms of space making through a set of ethical orientations towards forms of liberatory social transformation and change. As such we will be examining actions, manifesto’s, speculative fiction writing, poetics and other world-making strategies that abolitionist and anticolonial feminists have engaged to create alternative worlds. We account for and archive a critiquing of modes of discourses, and representations rooted in settler colonial atmospherics as we radically engage in theorizing ‘gatherings’ / relational creative work altering settler cartographies; and generate work together that explore practices and grammars feminist abolitionists are activating to create alternative spatial scales of liberation. For example, we will be exploring the writings and relational creative works of key thinkers such as: Angela Davis, Katherine McKittrick,& Mishauna Goeman.

WGS1031H: Gendering Racial Capitalism

Racial capitalism is a regime of capital accumulation predicated on the creation and mobilization of racial differences among human beings. This course aims to historicize racial capitalism both as a specific set of social relations in particular times/places and as a theoretical intervention into traditional Marxian political economy, underscoring the centrality of gender ideology to both modern conceptualizations of race and class. If capitalism alienates workers from the means of production, producing stratified class societies in the process, gender and race serve to divide human beings even further into different categories of human beings. They can function as critical fault lines of division and, simultaneously, as wellsprings of solidarity. Through a close reading of Cedric J. Robinson’s hallmark text, Black Marxism: The Black Radical Tradition, as well as critical engagement with historians of slavery, race, and reproduction; black feminists; queer theorists; and contemporary popular culture, students will grapple with the genealogies gendered racial capitalism. We will pay special attention of to the efforts of black feminists who have insisted on the centrality of intersectional approaches to both radical critiques of political economy and radical movements for liberation. At the same time, we will explore the flexibility and adaptability of racial capitalism –– its ability to absorb and deflect critique. Topics covered in this course include: racial capitalism and the black radical tradition; early modern capital accumulation and racial formation; race and reproduction from slavery to the contemporary mass incarceration; theorizing super-exploitation; neoliberalism, surveillance capitalism, the carceral state; queer anti-capitalism and the politics of pleasure.

For current course offerings, visit the top of this page or click here.